Recommended Reading Meme

David tagged me, and so I am obliged by the etiquette rules of theo-blogdom to offer you, dear readers, a short list of books that have influenced me greatly or to which I find myself frequently returning.
  1. John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion (Battles / McNeil edition)

  2. Calvin’s Institutes will make you a theologian. Giving sustained attention to Calvin for some reason other than declaring him unenlightened is frowned upon in some circles; giving sustained attention to Calvin because he pushes one to grapple with issues at a more fundamental level than does much conservative theology is frowned upon in some others. Nevertheless, he deserves and rewards careful study and, if nothing else, will give you an example of the marriage of biblical, pastoral and ‘systematic’ theology.

  3. Karl Barth, Evangelical Theology: An Introduction

  4. This was the first of Barth’s many books that I read, and I have read it numerous times since then. It never fails to cast new light on the many subjects that it addresses or on the thought and commitments of its author.

  5. Thomas F. Torrance, The Mediation of Christ

  6. David has this book on his list, and he is certainly right. It belongs on any such list. Torrance has provided in this short volume an excellent analysis of the gospel, Jesus Christ. If the combined force of David’s and my own recommendations is not enough for you, check out Torrance’s discussion of evangelism and how to preach the gospel.
I feel like I’m coping out by only mentioning three books, one of which David mentioned himself, but I must be excused because this is a bit repetitive. For more recommendations, check out my Amazon list entitled “A theological library for the Christian in the pew”, which highlights and comments on 9 books (including the three above).

Ah, yes. And now to tag some other unfortunates. Matt, John, Shane, Andy, and Michael.

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