My Most Recent Publication – Review of Matthew Levering’s “Theology of Augustine”

Just quick note here in case anyone is interested in tracking what my keyboard has been up to elsewhere, and in addition to the two lovely volumes that you can see in the left sidebar. Here’s the info on one of my recent book reviews. Well, not that recent. But I haven’t had a chance to put together a post on it until now.

Anyway, here is the citation:
W. Travis McMaken, review of Matthew Levering, The Theology of Augustine: An Introductory Guide to His Most Important Works (Baker Academic, 2013), Theology Today 70.3 (2013), 363–64.
You can access the review here if you have the right permissions.

For those who lack the right permissions, here is the review’s opening paragraph:
Matthew Levering, professor of religious studies at the University of Dayton and author of numerous theological books, ambitiously attempts in this compact volume to provide the reader with a novel entry point into the thought of one of the most significant figures in the history of Christianity—Augustine of Hippo. The ambition and novelty in this approach rest in Levering’s decision to introduce Augustine by discussing seven of his most important works: ‘‘On Christian Doctrine’’ (chapter 1), ‘‘Answer to Faustus’’ (chapter 2), ‘‘Homilies on the First Epistle to John’’ (chapter 3), ‘‘On the Predestination of the Saints’’ (chapter 4), ‘‘Confessions’’ (chapter 5), ‘‘City of God’’ (chapter 6), and ‘‘On the Trinity’’ (chapter 7). An introduction, conclusion, subject and scriptural indices, and suggestions for further reading round out the volume. Levering thus enables those encountering Augustine for the first time to quickly gain a valuable bird’s-eye view of his intellectual contours, while also discussing a number of important themes in the process.

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