About the Authors

Founder & Editor

W. Travis McMaken, PhD - Dr. McMaken serves as Associate Professor of Religion and Chair of the Interdisciplinary Studies program at Lindenwood University (access his faculty page here; access his current CV here). He welcomes professional and/or theological inquiries, especially if you are a young theologian trying to find your way (derevth [at] gmail [dot] com), or if you are interested in studying religion at Lindenwood. You are also invited to follow Dr. McMaken and his work on Twitter and / or on Academia.edu (or visit my About.me page to find links to my various corners of the interwebs). McMaken is ordained as a ruling elder in the Presbyterian Church (USA). He has broad research interests in the Reformed theological tradition and modern theology, especially figures like Karl Barth and Thomas Torrance, as well as in ecclesiology. His current project is a book that addresses the intersection of theology and politics in the life and thought of 20th century German pastor and theologian, Helmut Gollwitzer.

Associate Editor

Scott Jackson, PhD - Dr. Jackson is a writer and lay minister whose work seeks to integrate radical politics, dialectical theology, and Reformed dogmatics. His current research interests are in the areas of Christology, the principalities and powers, and the theologies of Karl Barth and William Stringfellow. For the past decade, Jackson has worked with his wife, Leah Gregg, coordinating the Jacob's Well ecumenical Christian community, whose ministries include outreach, hospitality, and study among the homeless, college students, and young adults in western Massachusetts.

Contributing Authors

Henry Coates - I am originally from a small town in central New Jersey. Although my mother is a PC(USA) minister, I grew up attending a small American Baptist Church with my father. After studying at Drew University in Madison, New Jersey and King’s College, London, I worked for Habitat for Humanity in New Orleans, where I rejoined a Presbyterian Church. Then I served as a Young Adult Volunteer through the PC(USA) in Nairobi, Kenya, working as a photographer for Church World Service. While in Kenya, I discerned a call for pastoral ministry. I returned to New Jersey to pursue MDiv studies at Princeton Theological Seminary, and graduated in May of 2012. Currently I live and work in New Orleans as a chaplain for the Port. My time is most enjoyably spent in travel, preaching, good books, whiskey, board games, and tea drinking.

Brandy Daniels - I am a PhD student in Theological Studies, and a fellow in the Theology and Practice program, at Vanderbilt University. My previous degrees include an MDiv, as well as an MA in comparative literature and African American studies from Duke. I am interested in theological anthropology as it relates to categories of identity, and particularly in exploring how the theologies of Karl Barth and Dietrich Bonhoeffer intersect with the critical theoretical projects of Michel Foucault and Judith Butler at precisely this juncture. I serve as the editor for the Speaking of Students newsletter for the American Academy of Religion, and I also have a personal blog where I write about theology, triathlons, bicycling, and beer, amongst other things.

Alex DeMarco - I am a recent MDiv grad from Princeton Theological Seminary, where I gravitated toward systematic theology, and the works of Friedrich Schleiermacher, Karl Barth, and Dietrich Bonhoeffer. I’ve been particularly interested in the relation between divine and human agency, as well as evil and divine providence. And I’ve recently begun a long overdue foray into the world of eco-theology. Exploring PhD study and/or ordained ministry in the Episcopal Church as possible futures, I’m currently serving as a more-or-less mediocre barista at my local Starbucks on the north side of Chicago. My wife and I are the aspiring outdoorsy types who nevertheless enjoy all the vibrant unpredictability and opportunity of life in the city.

Kathryn Bradford Heidelberger - I am currently serving as a Campus Minister coordinating Ecumenical and Interfaith Engagement at Benedictine University in Lisle, IL. Before coming to Benedictine I completed my Master of Divinity at Princeton Theological Seminary where I focused on historical and constructive theology and critical race theory. I am interested in theological method; how we go about constructing systems of thought/ways of speaking about God. I believe art is a vital companion to the theological method, so most of my work brings in poetry, visual art, and literature to enhance and nuance my theological arguments. I am married to my best friend, Max, and we have an adorable Bernese mountain dog named Calvin (yes, after the Reformation theologian). In our free time you can find us enjoying a good cup of coffee or local craft brew, reading, or catching up on one of our favorite TV shows.

Kate McCray - I am a wife, a Southerner, an Eastern Orthodox Christian. I am a recent MDiv graduate from Princeton Theological Seminary and will be pursuing a ThM at St. Vladimir's Orthodox Theological Seminary in the Fall. I spend my time studying the early Church, the Fathers and Mothers, and examining historical divisions. I am fascinated by the religions of the world, particularly Hinduism and Islam and especially where they intersect with Eastern Christianity. Ecumenical dialogue for me is not only a research interest but also a way of life as I personally navigate between Eastern and Western Christianities. I am interested in sensory worship, commensal practices, and in the practice of Orthodoxy in Western cultures.

Derek Maris - I am a PhD student in Systematic Theology at Luther Seminary. Some of the most influential theologians on my thinking are Jürgen Moltmann and Karl Barth, and I hope to use them as well as others to think through how eschatology and pneumatology relate in understanding God's transformative work in the world. I enjoy wasting time on the internet and listening to music, particularly 90's indie rock and grunge, as well as top shelf fingerstyle guitarists.

Jon Nelson - I currently live in Princeton, New Jersey with my lovely and extraordinarily patient wife. I am a Senior MDiv student at Princeton Theological Seminary, pursuing ordination in the PC(USA) and eventual doctoral work in Systematic Theology. My primary interest lies in the doctrine of Holy Scripture, which gives me an excuse to indulge in a variety of interests in theology, hermeneutics, and biblical studies. However, many would say that my primary interest is listening to music and perusing music blogs.

Matt Warren - My primary occupation is teaching high school social studies and coaching track & field (hurdles!). I occasionally have the opportunity to fill pulpit supply for local PC(USA) congregations. I am an Associate Professor of Philosophy & Religious Studies at Mercer County Community College; I also teach courses in history and philosophy at Middlesex County College. I recently began my PhD at the University of Aberdeen, working on the theology and ethics of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, with special focus on his pneumatology. Previously, I completed my MDiv and ThM at Princeton Theological Seminary and my BA in history at TCNJ. My favorite theologians are Calvin, Schleiermacher, Barth, Paul Zahl, and above all, my wife.

J. T. Young - My family and I live in Princeton, NJ where I am currently a MDiv student at Princeton Theological Seminary and pastor at Neshanic United Methodist Church in Neshanic Station, NJ. My interests lie first-and-foremost in modern Christian thought, viz. the theology and politics of Karl Barth, (primarily the young Barth from 1911-1921), the Blumhardts, and the intersection of dialectical theology with contemporary missiology. I am hoping to pursue further doctoral study when my time in the MDiv program comes to an end. Until then, when I don’t have my nose stuck in a book, I am usually spending time with my wonderful wife, Amy (who is way out of my league) and my adorable little boy, Boston (who gets all his good looks from his mother).

In addition to these contributors, DET often hosts guest posts.

N.B. Any views expressed in posts on this blog are only necessarily the view of the author at that particular point in time, and should not be interpreted as anything more. In fact, it is best to think of blog posts as provisional attempts at articulating a position rather than as permanent or even semi-permanent articulations.